Posts Tagged ‘ misc ’

Hello, again

Well, it has been two or three years since this site has been updated on anything resembling a regular basis, but that will hopefully change in the near future. I cannot guarantee anything, but I’m hoping to turn my attention toward The City Desk once again, work the cobwebs out of my head and trick…

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Moving

For the next week or so, The City Desk will be taking a break, as we move into our new home office. In the meantime, why not enjoy some older pieces you may have missed? :: The Main Avenue Tramway :: Why it is called ‘Black Friday’ :: Christmastime in the City :: The Underground…

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When the Moving Pictures Came to Town

When the Moving Pictures Came to Town

In the first part of the 20th century, before making the cross-country trek to Hollywood, the motion picture industry settled briefly in our fair city. During the early years of cinema, film companies were based on the east coast, centered in New York City. However, costs began to increase exponentially, due to both organized crime…

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Briefs

Briefs

Oh, You Never Knew It! Wimple and Bing, the City’s fifth-most-famous intersection, was almost known as Wimple and Porkpie! In 1903, due to inattentive aldermen, street-naming honors had devolved to the rascals of the Bottling District. A Mr. Elliott Lamb sought to name that “elm-festooned” promenade after Porkpie, his prize-winning mule. But on the way…

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Out you two pixies go- through the door, or out the window

Salon: All hail Pottersville! In Capra’s Tale of Two Cities, Pottersville is the Bad Place. It’s the demonic foil to Bedford Falls, the sweet, Norman Rockwell-like town in which George grows up. Named after the evil Mr. Potter, Pottersville is the setting for George’s brief, nightmarish trip through a world in which he never existed.…

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Metropolis: “The Vanishing Class”

Though this story focuses upon New York, the same thing is happening in cities across the country. In June the Brookings Institution released a study called “Where Did They Go? The Decline of Middle-Income Neighborhoods in Metropolitan America.” It found that middle-income neighborhoods constituted 58 percent of all urban neighborhoods in 1970, but that the…

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